Brexit: What It Means for Tech (But Don’t Panic)

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Here’s How NASCAR Is Digitizing Race Day

When cars leave the starting line at Sonoma Raceway in California on Sunday for the start of the Toyota/Save Mart 350, they’ll be taking part in the launch of a product designed to help NASCAR officials monitor and manage the 110-lap race.

New race management software that NASCAR is launching on Sunday is designed to give officials a single screen to watch where cars are on the racetrack, manage penalties and share information with racing teams about what’s going on.

It arose from a partnership between NASCAR and Microsoft that started in 2014. It began with a mobile inspection app that let race officials see whether cars were in compliance with all the rules about how they have to be constructed.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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Why the UK’s Vote to Leave the EU Will Have Little Effect on Its Data Protection Rules

With the haircut that the sterling-euro exchange rate has taken in the wake of the U.K.’s vote to leave the European Union, the U.K. has suddenly become a low-cost country for companies wishing to host or process the personal information of EU citizens.

EU businesses will need to weigh that price cut against the regulatory uncertainty Thursday’s vote introduced — but it turns out that’s surprisingly small, at least in the short to medium term.

As for U.K. businesses hoping for more relaxed data protection rules in the wake of the referendum vote, they will have to wait — perhaps for a very long while.

That’s because many of the rules that the 51.9 percent who voted to leave the EU hoped to escape are, in fact, firmly part of U.K. law, and will only go away if the U.K. parliament votes to repeal them.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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Why APIs Beat Proxies for Cloud Security

While many businesses laud the benefits of cloud computing, some feel less than 100 percent confident in their ability to fully secure their cloud resources.

Is it any wonder? Your corporate network might link to multiple cloud services, run by different operators. Mobile users might be accessing cloud resources simultaneously over dissimilar WANs and device types. Some users and devices fall under your management domain; others don’t.

In fact, corporate data seems to be everywhere. It’s being copied, emailed, shared, and synced wherever users happen to be working. So it’s tough to know exactly where sensitive data is being stored and who has access to it.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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