Salesforce New Community Cloud Brings Big Data Analytics to Entire CRM

SalesforceCC 300x198 Salesforce New Community Cloud Brings Big Data Analytics to Entire CRMIt is not always easy for organizations to stay in touch with customers, partners and employees through home communities. With Salesforce’s new Community Cloud, companies can create their communities, in the LinkedIn style, but for their customers, partners and employees.

Built on the Salesforce Community Cloud Platform – via Connect API – companies can directly connect to Salesforce CRM and data sources and third-party systems. In this way, companies can deliver better service to their customers, more sales through partners and increase employee engagement. Salesforce research shows that digital communities guarantee 48 percent faster problem resolution, a 48 percent increase in employee engagement, 45 percent more customer satisfaction and 43 percent increase in sales through partners.

Community Cloud has a new feature called Targeted Recommendations which seeks to promote user engagement on these sites. The new feature, which is based on algorithms that analyze structured and unstructured data, is designed to bring members of the community the most relevant content, as inputs, resources, files and groups. The community managers can suggest content to specific information or an ad in the news and direct it to a group member type or a specific individual.

The second new feature now available is called Lightning Community Builder and Templates, and allows any business user community to deploy a customized, branded and optimized for mobile devices without the need to seek the help of IT. Companies can use Lightning Builder to create your own custom communities with custom applications. For example, a non-profit institution could build an application to organize volunteer events and incorporate it into the home page of your community.

Finally, Salesforce Connect for Google Drive Files is a new feature that allows community members to share any file created or stored in Google Drive. Thus, a marketing team could share a file from Google with the campaign planning group to easily access and work on it. You can also attach files within Google Drive to a record, as sales opportunities or service case.

According to IDC, the enterprise collaboration market was $ 1.24 billion in 2014, and the market expected to reach $ 3.5 billion in 2018, an annual growth of 23.1%. The sector as defined by IDC includes software for collaboration internally and externally. Other major players such as IBM Connections, Microsoft Yammer, Jive Software, Tibco Tibbr, Zimbra and SAP Jam also have a foot in this market.

Last year, Microsoft and Salesforce have signed a strategic partnership to create new solutions that will enable you to connect the platform and the CRM app to Windows and Office apps. The agreement provides that the Salesforce CRM solution is integrated with the Windows OS, the Azure cloud platform and the office suite Office 365.


CloudTimes

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IDG Contributor Network: Is Your DNS Set Up for Success? Ask Yourself These 4 Questions

Have you ever really thought about the importance of DNS to your business?

DNS, the Domain Name System, is sometimes called the “phonebook of the Internet.” Just as the phonebook allows you to look up names, addresses, and phone numbers of people and businesses to be categorized and referenced, DNS allows for domain names and their corresponding IP addresses to be organized and easily accessed. For example, a quick DNS query shows that the IPv4 address for networkworld.com is 70.42.185.102 (and there is apparently no IPv6 address!).

But DNS stores much more than just IP addresses. Email protocols rely on DNS extensively to store information about message routing (MX records), policy (SPF records) and digital signatures (DKIM). DNS also houses cryptographic keys for not only its own security uses, but also for email and now even websites (TLSA records). The extensibility, versatility, and ubiquity of DNS makes it an ideal choice for storing all kinds of information. Because so much depends on DNS, it is a critically important service; every time you use the Internet, you’re relying on DNS.  

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Network World Cloud Computing

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Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next Level

brillo1 300x155 Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next LevelWith the acquisition of Nest last year, Google has demonstrated its interest in the field of smart home. At recently concluded Google I/O annual developer conference, the group of Mountain View celebrates a further step forward, talking openly about the Internet of Things.

Born Brillo, a project to connect any device used, not only smartphones, tablets, computers and smartwatch, but also those that are part of everyday life such as home appliances, cars, surveillance systems etc.

Brillo is the ecosystem through which Google intends to play a leading role in the IoT. It is a platform derived from Android, and reduced to essentials to be performed on devices with minimum system requirements, therefore, suitable to be fitted for example in lamps for smart intelligently manage the lighting system of the house. The strength of Brillo is the ability to recognize these devices in an entirely automatic way in smartphones and tablets, as well as simplify the configuration process, making it accessible even to beginners.

It will be able to connect devices of all kinds, through the use of sensors from the extremely low power consumption, enabling them to communicate with each other and enabling users to interact with it such as centralized refrigerators, equipment for monitoring of home, lighting and much more talking to each other.

In addition to home automation, Brillo is also designed for industrial use. Thus, a plant could, for example, use it to connect its sensors and manufacturing equipment.

Google’s another project Weave will be used as the cross-platform protocol, based on JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), through which developers can put in communication between their devices and objects compatible with Brillo, thereby taking advantage of the enormous potential of synchronization of cloud platforms and Mobile application versatility.

As regards the technical specifications, it seems that the software developed by Google can run on devices with a small quantity of RAM, even if only 32 or 64 MB. It supports Wi-Fi connectivity and Bluetooth low energy, does not require particularly powerful processors to run and the Thread protocol used by equipment designed by Nest, a Google property company specializing in intelligent thermal control systems.

Google Brillo IoT is based on a kernel that is derivative of the Android system; naturally it compact the bone to be unified with devices of very small size and devices not too capable on the hardware side. Given the market share of Android and the open source nature, Brillo has the potential to reach the same level as Android. The choice of keeping popular Android mobile OS caters especially to the simplification of procedures developed by device manufacturers.

One thing is sure – one linked to the Internet of Things is a new territory, but which have already staked their eyes for all big technology industries. Microsoft recently announced the arrival of a specially developed IoT version of the Window 10 operating system. Huawei has presented an IoT platform called LiteOS weighing just 10 kB and Samsung has already launched the chip design intended specifically for this sector.

The IoT will come soon in our lives every day without making too much noise with a number of interconnected devices that will grow dramatically in the coming years, and it is obvious that all the big names are getting ready to new market requirements.


CloudTimes

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Google Container Engine: Ready to Rock ‘n’ Roll

Google Container Engine is finally out of beta. The search-engine-cum-advertising-broker is also all about that containerization.

But is Google’s use of open-source projects such as Docker and Kubernetes entirely unselfish? Or will proprietary Google “enhancements” lock you in?

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers float away, dreaming of simple devops.

Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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